MOUNTAIN DIVAS: Helmet Safety 101

Form Over Function … or Safety First?

A Guide to fitting and buying helmets.

By Laurie Sammis

If we are really honest with ourselves…we have to admit that for many Mountain Diva’s form comes before function. You know the drill and you’ve seen them on the hill (perhaps even secretly admiring them from afar). It’s the perfectly pulled together Diva with the color-coordinated outfit and somehow matching accessories. The fact that she has the latest in ski technology and can shred the mountain like a pro just adds to the awe factor.

But, when it comes to helmets, every Diva (especially mountain mamas) knows the mantra: SAFETY FIRST.

Why safety first? Well, we need to set a good example for our kids, as well as our sisters and peers. And since we are often the ones purchasing helmets for our kids, it is even more important that we know the essentials–and the DOs and DON’Ts of proper helmet fitting.

The good news is that helmet design has come a long way since the classic Bell downhill ski helmets first hit the slopes. They are now lightweight, aerodynamic and well padded (some even have extra soft ear flap choices). They also come in lots of shapes and sizes (to fit every head shape) and are offered in a dazzling array of colors, designs and finishes (Mountain Divas rejoice…you can still feel like you are choosing form over function, even if it is safety first)!!

To help you make the right choice, hear are a few tips on getting the perfect fit, followed by a quick rundown on some of the more popular helmets you’ll see on the slopes this winter:

Getting The Right Fit

1. Measure Your Head. Ski helmets are generally sized based upon your head circumference (usually measured in centimeters). Even the ones that use a Small, Medium, Large scale are  based on head circumference, so measure your head and compare to the manufacturer’s size chart. Measure one inch above the eyebrows all the way around. Measure kids’ head circumference in the same manner. (Jump to the end of this blog for a conversion chart of centimeters to inches.)

2. Try On Several Brands. Be sure you try BEFORE you buy. Remember that ski and boarder helmets, just like heads, come in lots of different shapes and sizes, and there is one that will be the best fit for your head. The wrong shape will feel too tight (and may even pinch or have “hot spots” in certain areas) or will be too loose at the top or on the sides. Keep trying. Just like Godilocks, there will be one that will fit “just right.”

3. Check the Fit. This is really important for fitting kids helmets. A helmet should fit securely, but not so tight you have pain. “The helmet should feel snug around the crown and shouldn’t move around too much,” says Greg Bearce, supervisor at Pete Lane’s Warm Springs. If it feels like a good fit, try the following test:  gently hold the helmet in place and try to turn your head from side to side, then up and down. The helmet should feel snug and should have very little room for movement (less than an inch), and should not obscure your vision.

4. Bring Your Goggles. Be sure to bring your goggles to make sure they fit your helmet. Otherwise, you may find yourself at the top of the mountain on a powder day without proper visibility, because your goggles are too big or too small to fit your helmet.

Kids on Dollar Ski Cross Course5. Ski Helmets for Children. Whatever you do, don’t buy a helmet that is too big or it will be useless. This is especially important when buying for kids or trying to recycle helmets for younger siblings. Resist the temptation to buy a helmet for a child to “grow into” because the fit will be wrong and the helmet won’t be able do its job of absorbing the impact and preventing concussions.

6. Don’t  Wear a Beanie or Hat Under Your Helmet. “This is one of the biggest fashion misconceptions out there,” says Greg Bearce, supervisor at Pete Lanes Warm Springs. “A beanie is var far the worst thing you can wear under a helmet because it prevents the helmet from doing its job,” adds Bearce, “it just allows for too much movement, doesn’t let the helmet do what it was designed to do and can lead to the compression injuries that cause concussions.” Bearce notes that some of the really thin skull caps can work under helmets because they conform exactly to the head. But when in doubt, just avoid any thicker under layers–having the room to fit a hat or beanie probably means that the helmet is too big and is not a proper fit anyway.

Helmet Style, Accessories & Options

Now onto the more creative part of helmet buying. Once you have the proper fit, you can get down to the details of style, color and accessories. Remember that different age groups have different priorities when choosing helmets–some are attracted to aerodynamics or accessories (wireless audio system ear flaps or full cell phone and in-line components) while others (especially younger kids) are drawn to the more immediate visuals of cool colors, metallic finishes or unique designs. And if you can’t find the perfect combo, you can always consider decals or stickers to add a design of your own.

Smith Intrigue

Smooth, flowing lines and elegant finishing details complement the Intrigue’s low profile Hybrid Shell construction. Combining AirEvac 2 ventilation and a soft, fleeced tricot lining beneath a refined collection of designs, the Intrigueis the ideal helmet for women of discriminating tastes. It also has the option for the Skullcandy Audio System (an added bonus for Divas who like to carry their tunes with them down the mountain). And it comes a wide range of fantastic colors, including Black Pearl, White Pearl, Shadow Green, Antique/Coral, Bronze Fallen, Petal Blue Briston, Shadow Purple Baroque, White Fallen.

 

 

 Smith Voyage

Revolutionary new technology discreetly concealed behind a bevy of stylish accents, the all-new Voyage will take you on a trip you never thought possible. Using revolutionary Hybrid In-Mold technology to minimize mass and maximize ventilation, the Voyage offers up the ultimate in performance without sacrificing one ounce of style. This patented technology weighs in a little less (at 450 grams/16 ounces) than the Smith Intrigue and currently comes in White, Black, Ivory Bristol, Ultramarine Night Out, Frost Gray Stereo or Paris Pink Baroque.

 

 

GIRO Seam

Giro’s Seam is the perfect all mountain helmet. An improved Thermostat vent system, Giro’s Stack Vent, and a feather light weight will keep your temp under control, your goggles clear and your comfort level at an all time high. Finish it off with the best fit system ever made (with an adjustable wheel in the back to help dial in the perfect fit) for a snow helmet and you are ready for a full day on the mountain. Lots of Giro accessories (like stereo ear flaps and other adjustments) and a wide range of colors make this a popular and functional helmet for both kids AND adults. Available in Matte Brown, Matte White, Matte Pewter, Cyan Tiles, Matte Black, Matte Red, Black Towers, Matte Blue Sunset, Matte Grey Stripes.

 

 

POC Skull Comp – Bode or Julia

The ultimate race helmet, upgraded. The Skull Comp is now updated to version 2.0, adding a new unique safety feature. After finding that today’s race skiers repeatedly hit gates hard and risk to deform the liner, we shifted the core material to multi impact EPP. On top of the liner, we use a thin outer shell in combination with our patented Aramid membrane penetration barrier, APB. To optimize the energy absorption properties, pneumatic honeycomb pads made of polyurethane are inserted into the multi impact EPP liner. Great fit, performance and protection over and overagain!

There are two editions of the POC Skull Comp, one designed by Bode Miller and one by Julia Mancuso–both extraordinary athletes at the top of their sport. Bode Miller rides with his POC Skull Comp Pro Model helmet in green and white. There is also a Poc Skull Comp Pro – Julia that is blue and white in honor of pro racer Julia Mancuso. And, as if the extreme protection and functionality weren’t enough, the Julia edition Skull Comp comes with a kit of Swarowski Crystals to make your own Julia style tiara.

A pro race helmet with Wwarowski Crystals…Mountain Divas REJOICE!!

Finally, form plus function.

 

Giro Seam, Mtn Blue Sunset

 

==============================

    Helmet Size Conversion Chart
    Centimeters to Inches
    52 cm = 20- inches
    53 cm = 20-7/8 inches
    54 cm = 21 inches
    55 cm = 21 5/8 inches
    56 cm = 22 inches
    57 cm = 22 3/8 inches
   58 cm = 22 inches
   59 cm = 23 inches
   60 cm = 23 5/8 inches

 ==============================

Lift Line: Six@Sochi aims to get local athletes at the 2014 Winter Olympics

The Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation’s Gold Team has big Olympic dreams.

By Katie Matteson

The Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation (SVSEF) has a storied history of cultivating elite winter athletes. For over 40 years, the SVSEF’s ski, snowboard, freestyle and Nordic teams have coached, trained and taught local athletes to be the best athletes they can be, encouraging "strong minds, strong bodies, strong futures." Each winter, over 500 local skiers and boarders join the teams, learning discipline, balance, commitment and how to enjoy skiing and snowboarding for a lifetime. Whether these athletes go on to become professional athletes or just well-rounded community members, the SVSEF plays an important role in the development of the local participants. Athletes like Kristin Cooper, Picabo Street, Graham Watanabe, and the Crist Brothers are all alums of the SVSEF. They are also all Olympic athletes.

Based on this tradition of elite athleticism, the SVSEF has now launched an additional mission, "Six@Sochi," with a goal of getting six SVSEF athletes at the 2014 Sochi Olympics. These athletes, members of the SVSEF’s Gold Team, are all at the top of their discipline and the Sochi Olympics are within their grasp. This year’s Gold Team (many of whom are current US Ski or Snowboard Team Members) includes Nordic racers Morgan Arritola, Simi Hamilton, Chelsea Holmes, Matt Gelso, Mike Sinnott and Alexa Turzian, Alpine racers Tanner Farrow, Teagen Palmer and Kipling Wiesel , snowboarder Kaitlyn Farrington, and freestyle skiers Tai Barrymore and Shane Cordeau.

Here is a roundup of a few of these local athletes, Nordic skiers, freestyle skiers, bump skiers, snowboarders and alpine racers. So next time they pass you on a Nordic trail, ride up the lift with you or boost out of the halfpipe on Dollar right in front of your astonished eyes, you might just be in the company of a future Olympic Champion. (Athlete profiles courtesy of the SVSEF).

 

Kaitlyn Farrington: US Snowboard Team Member

Kaitlyn Farrington

As a junior in the SVSEF Snowboard Program Kaitlyn always showed potential in the halfpipe, then she exploded to the top of the ranks last year. In 2010 Kaitlyn dominated the results and was recognized as one of the best women halfpipe riders competing. A few of Kaitlyn’s successes in 2010: Winter Dew Tour Overall Champion; won the European X-Games, beating Vancouver Olympic Gold Medalist Torah Bright; and was on the podium 6 of her last 7 competitions. Needless to say, Kaitlyn was named to the US Snowboard Team and is looking for the Gold in Sochi.

 

 

 

 

Shane Cordeau: US Ski Team Member

Shane Cordeau

Shane was born and raised here in Sun Valley.  He grew up chasing his father, 4x World mogul champion, Joe Cordeau all around Baldy.  Those ski lessons paid off and in 2009 Shane finished 2nd on the Nor-Am Mogul tour earning a spot on the U.S. Freestyle ski team.  Shane got his rookie season off to a fast start finishing 1st at the U.S. Freestyle Selections event in December 2010.  He followed that up with a 4th place at the U.S Olympic Trials in Steamboat Springs, Co., two weeks later.  Shane made his World Cup debut at Deer Valley, UT., in January 2011.  Shane was the highest qualifying American and finished an impressive 13th overall.  Shane had two more top 25 results in World Cup competitions before suffering a season ending injury. Now fully recovered Shane has set his sights on this coming season, "I am ready to continue my pursuit of taking over the World Cup circuit during the next four years leading up to the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

 

 

 

Tai Barrymore: SVSEF Gold Team Member

Tai Barrymore

Tai returns to the SVSEF Gold Team after another successful season of Half-pipe competitions. Tai is one of the youngest athletes competing in the Dew Tour, North Face Open, U.S. Grand Prix, and X Games. Tai travelled to 4 different countries on 3 different continents and competed in 10 halfpipe events last year.  It was a whirlwind season.  He made the finals of every major event he entered and remained healthy throughout the year.  His results include:

2010 Dew Tour-Breckenridge, Co 14th

2010 U.S. Grand Prix-Copper Mtn, Co 19th

2011 North Face Open-Northstar, Ca 9th

2011 SFR French Open-Tignes, Fr, 1st

2011 World Cup- La Plange, Fr, 13th

2011 Euro X Games- Tignes, Fr, 16th

2011 World Superpipe Championships- Whistler, Ca 14th

2011 New Zealand Open- Cadrona, NZ, 7th

The IOC has officially announced that Ski Half-pipe will be included in the 2014 Olympics.  Tai is focused on competing at that event.  He is excited for another whirlwind season competing in one of the most dynamic and physically challenging ski disciplines in the world.  Tai continues to train year round with our younger athletes; mentoring, encouraging and supporting the team.  He is an inspiration to all of our athletes and is living proof that you can get there from here!

 

Morgan Arritola: US Ski Team Member

Morgan Arritola

Morgan is currently regarded as one of nation’s top female Nordic athletes.  At the young age of 25 she already has an impressive list of results tallied to her name, including over a half dozen podiums at National Championships, competitive world-class results at numerous World Championships and the 2010 Olympic Winter Games.  Morgan’s athletic talents extend beyond skis to the XC running trails where during the 2011 summer she chalked up two national titles- one at the XC running Half Marathon National Championships in Bend, OR., and the second in the XTerra Half Marathon National Championships in Ogden, UT.  Morgan is primed for an outstanding 2011-12 ski season and will be a legitimate contender in any distance race she enters the entire season.

Carrier Highlights:

21st Place 30K Mass Start Skate 2011 World Ski Championships Oslo, NOR

19th Place 15K Mass Start Skate 2010 World Cup La Clusaz, FRA

22nd Place 30k Mass Start Skate 2009 World Ski Championships Liberec, CZE

SVSEF at Dollar

Face – Ottos backup

Mini World Cup

Adele Savaria at adelesav@cox.net

Coaches at 8:30

SVSEF at Dollar

Face – Ottos as backup

SVSEF

Dollar – Face – Ottos backup

Mini World Cup

Contact Adele Savaria at adelesav@cox.net

Coaches at 8:30

SVSEF Dollar – Ottos

Mini world cup

Adele Savaria; adelesav@cox.net

Coaches at 8:30

Bill Janss Pro-Am Race on April 8th and 9th.

Bill Janss Pro-Am is a benefit race for the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation Athletes. This is a dual giant slalom team event. Racing begins at 10:30am on the Warm Springs side of Bald Mountain. For more information, contact the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation at (208) 726-4129 or www.svsef.org.

J-3 Junior Olympics Giant Slalom and Slalom Qualifying Races on Hemingway, Greyhawk and Cozy.

USSA J-3 Junior Olymic Qualifying Giant Slalom Racing is on Hemingway and Greyhawk, and the Slalom Racing is on Cozy starting at 9:30am. For more information, contact the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation at (208) 726-4129 or www.svsef.org.

Monroe Cup Slalom Race on Hemingway and Cozy.

USSA J-4, J-5 and J-6  slalom race sponsored by the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation. For more information, contact the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation at (208) 726-4129 or visit their website at www.svsef.org.

Lonnie Basolo Memorial Giant Slalom Race on Hemingway and Cozy.

USSA J-4, J-5 and J-6 giant slalom race sponsored by the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation. For more information, contact the Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation at (208) 726-4129 or visit their website at www.svsef.org.